CW2001

CW2001

Ball State University
Muncie, Indiana

Ted Nellen



Saturday
8:15 — 9:45 Session F.1
Online English Learning Environments:
K-12 Models, Tools, and Strategies
RB 104
Ted Nellen
Start Your Own CyberEnglish Class

10:00 — 11:30 Session G.1
Computers & Writing in the New Millennium:
Will the Odyssey Continue ‘til 2010?
RB 125
Scholarship Will Be Best Served on the Computer

1:30 — 3:00 Session H.5
Making Connections:
Hypertext, Standards, and the Portfolio
RB 284
It’s Not About the Standards:
It’s About Creating Student-Scholars on the Web

Sunday
8:15 — 9:45 Townhall II:
E-Literacy and Orality —
The Hands-Free, Voice-Activated,
Any-to-Any Future Classroom
RB 125



Saturday
8:15 — 9:45 Session F.1
Online English Learning Environments:
K-12 Models, Tools, and Strategies
RB 104
Nancy Patterson, moderator
Ted Nellen
Start Your Own CyberEnglish Class
Setting up a CyberEnglish class of your own may seem like a
daunting task, but it is not. In this session, you will hear from
someone who created it in a NYC public high school in 1993 and
from another NYC public high school teacher who followed the
model and set up her own class with some assistance. As more
and more computers are in the classroom and as more and more
English teachers are trying to make the most of these computers, hear
from another who has successfully found ways to use the computers in
hir English curriculum without sacrificing the integrity of standards.
These Web sites can help you prepare for this session:
(1) www.tnellen.net/cyberenglish;



10:00 — 11:30 Session G.1
Computers & Writing in the New Millennium:
Will the Odyssey Continue ‘til 2010?
RB 125
Doug Eyman, moderator
Steven Krause
The End of Computers and Writing:
Benefactors and Victims of Success
I believe the implications of this are that while we should be celebrating
our success, we should also be preparing ourselves to think more
broadly than our own subdiscipline.
Nick Carbone
Computers and Writing Will Always Exist
I don’t agree that computers and writing will become redundant, or
that computers will become invisible, not in terms of scholarship or in
the value of this conference anyway. Writing will change because of
computers, and our field’s intellectual future is there, in understanding
that change and figuring out how best to teach given the change.
Trish Harris
Computers, Writing, and the Limit of Ubiquity
The moment of resistance is past, and in the not-too-distant future we will
be defined by our activity and practice rather than the soon-ubiquitous
level of technical proficiency or soon-irrelevant divide between CR and CW.
Bill Hart-Davidson
Computers <&> Writing:
Rewriting our Disciplinary Source Code?
Those who study at the intersection of the two most powerful communication
technologies the world has known — “computers” and “writing” — will be
called for their expertise to these new cross-disciplinary, inter-institutional,
and international efforts to transform our networks of information into
social networks.
Ted Nellen
Scholarship Will Be Best Served on the Computer
We are now on the threshold of actually realizing the pedagogical dreams
of Dewey as they have been further defined by Gardner and ultimately
practiced by those of us who use computers and the Internet in our work.



Saturday
1:30 — 3:00 Session H.5
Making Connections:
Hypertext, Standards, and the Portfolio
RB 284
Rich Rice, moderator
Janice McIntire-Strasburg
The Flash or the Trash?:
Using Web Portfolios to Assess Student Writing
The flexibility of online or Web page portfolios offers clear opportunities
for students to customize and analyze cross-situational differences in
process and use that information to improve their writing across the
semester. As an added bonus, it also allows them to view their
personal process(es) and fine tune them through varied projects,
giving them information that they can apply to situations throughout
their writing lives. This paper intends to explore assessment strategies
and opportunities in Web portfolios.
Carl Whithaus
Reading and Evaluating Student-Created Hypertext:
What Do We Do with These Things???
By inviting students to talk back to the teacher-reader, I argue that
we can extend the descriptive process begun by teacher-scholars to
include students. This dialogic approach to student-created hypertext
makes the questions and problems of evaluation visible. Top-down
analyses and descriptions give way to negotiated understandings of
what students are attempting to accomplish. Dialogizing response
(Gay) and using portfolio-based approaches to negotiate the criteria for
judging effective writing (Murphy and Smith), we transform evaluation
from a one-way discourse into an interactive process.
Ted Nellen
It’s Not About the Standards;
It’s About Creating Student-Scholars on the Web
Participants are introduced to the idea of how to transform their
students into scholars by using the Web. Participants are introduced to
the process of publishing their students work online including discussion
of AUP, permission slips, Web sites at school or free, and basic html. In
addition, participants are introduced to the idea of telementoring.



Sunday
8:15 — 9:45 Townhall II:
E-Literacy and Orality —
The Hands-Free, Voice-Activated,
Any-to-Any Future Classroom
RB 125
Dene Grigar, moderator
John Barber, Tari Fanderclai, Ted Nellen, Kay Robinson, Rich Rice,
Carlton Clark, Nick Carbone, Jeff Rice, Becky Rickly
This open forum will include reflections about future iterations of
technological tools that may be used in the writing classroom by
some members of the Computers and Writing Community working
in cutting–edge fields or teaching in innovative ways. Speaker positions
are available at www.bsu.edu/cw2001/townhall.htm. The question:
What tools will we likely use in the future, and why? Each presenter
will have 2-3 minutes to provide an opening statement.


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